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101 "He was admitted sizar at Peterhouse College, Cambridge, 2 Jul 1625, and took the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1628/9.

"In 1637, with his wife and one or two children, his two sisters, and his yonger brother William, he emigrated to New England, and, after tarrying first at Cambridge, Mass., moved in the same year to Salem. He was admitted freeman 2 Nov 1637, was preacher and schoolmaster at Salem . . ., moved to Wenham in 1641, gathered a church there, of which he was pastor, 1644-1656, and then went. with the greater part of his church, to Chelmsford, where he was the first pastor and served both in that office and also as physician until his death." 
FISKE, Rev. John (I5362)
 
102 "He was an apothecary and chemist at New Bedford, and in 1834, removed to Scipio, NY." OTIS, Job (I3032)
 
103 "He was one of the first four soldiers of Lancaster who went on the long expeditions; and shared the hardships and misfortunes of Sir William Phip's ill-fated expedition to Canada in 1690. he was killed by the Indians, with one of his his children, in the massacre of Sept 11, 1697, and his wife was taken captive and carried to Canada, but was afterward rescued or ransomed by the government. She was received at 'Cascoe Bay, ye 17 January, 1698-9, aboard the Province Gally,' and returned home to her surviving children." FAIRBANKS, Jonathan (I3246)
 
104 "He was reared on the farm and attended the district school until 18 years of age and later spent two winters in attendance at the Chamberlin Institute at Randolph, NY. For a number of years he followed the carpenter trade and in April 1875, came to Crawford county, first settling at Westside.

"On April 3, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss Lucy Ann Lyman, the wedding ceremony being performed at the home of her sister in Logan. The couple soon moved to a farm between Westside and VAil and it was here that their three children were born, Lyman Bowen of Warm Springs, Mont., and Mildred and Alfred, both at home.

"[I]n the spring of 1898 [Mr. Bowen] moved to Denison and went into the wagon repairing business for five years, after which he again took up the carpenter trade, retiring in 1925. Mrs. Bowen died in 1915 and he has since made his home with his son Alfred and his daughter Mildred." (Obituary of Alfred H. Bowen, 8 Jun 1933, Denison, Iowa newspaper.) 
BOWEN, Alfred Henry (I1629)
 
105 "He [John Scott] served as a Lieutenant and Commissry at Pennsylvania General Hospital in the Revolutionary War. John Scott is the same ancestor under whom Mrs. Caroline Scott Harrison (wife of President Harrison, ex-Presidnet of United States) entered the N.S.D.A.R."

"The war record of John Scott was taken from a report from the War Department, filed with Natl. No 7, 2522 or 10,409 D.A.R. Lineage Books. Family Bible Census Reports herewith." (DAR App. No. 341594.)

John's will was proved 27 Jun 1799. (Internet Posting by Bill LaBach.) 
SCOTT, John (I513)
 
106 "He [Matthew] m 2ndly Pembroke, Mass Dec 1, 1714 MARY NEAL of Braintree, pos either the Mary Neale, dau of Joseph and Mary Neale, who was born Braintree Sep 14, 1689, or the dau of Samuel and Abigail Neale who was b there Jan 22, 1687; she was bap Scituate 1-5-1722 . . . ." NEAL, Mary (I3920)
 
107 "He [Phineas] emigrated to New England, with his wife and children, and was in Salem, Mass., as early as 1641, was admitted freeman 18 May 1642, and in 1644 moved to Wenham, a town set off from Salem in 1643. He was a captain and, in 1653, a representative in the General Court." Family F2070
 
108 "He [Stephen] was nine years old when he accompanied his father to New England. Followed the occupation of tanning." PAINE, Stephen Jr. (I3172)
 
109 "He [Thomas] descended from William Chickering who d. in 1356, and he from Jeffry de Chickering, Hoxne Parish, Suffolk Co, Eng. Lord of the manor of Chickering, Chickering Hall." CHICKERING, Thomas (I3149)
 
110 "He [Walter] settled in the part of Scituate called 'TheTwo Miles,' which was joined to Marshfield in 1788; and the house he built there is still standing and is the residence of Israel H. Hatch, his descendant." HATCH, Walter (I4925)
 
111 "He [William] was of Stadhaugh and lived during the reigns of Henry Vi, Edward IV, and Richard III." FISKE, William (I4667)
 
112 "Henry was a descendant of Major Simon Willard, who came from the County of Kent, England, and settled in Cambridge in 1634, and in the following year removed to Concord, where he was prominently connected with the affairs of the town and colony." WILLARD, Henry (I5534)
 
113 "Henry's widow Mary brought her sons to New England, and was a resident of Dedham, Massachusetts Nov. 20, 1646, on which date she relinquished her interest in a parcel of land belonging to the Manor of Benacre Hall, Suffolk, England." Family F1250
 
114 "His will dated Dec. 10, 1760, was probated Feb 22, 1762." BUFFUM, Joshua (I3455)
 
115 "His will was dated March 20, 1756. In court, June 5, 1756, Mary Pope the widow, was appointed executrix." POPE, John (I3880)
 
116 "His will, dated Sept 11, 1666, mentions wife Gertrude executrix. In court 27.4, 1667." POPE, Joseph (I692)
 
117 "Hon Solomon Lincoln of Hingham." LINCOLN, Hon Solomon (I3052)
 
118 "Humphrey Turner, born in England, probably Devonshire, and sailed perhaps from Holland with his family, arriving in Plymouth, N. E. 1628. He was a tanner. A house lot was assigned to him in 1629 in Scituate, and built [sic] a house in which he probably lived in 1633. . . . Humphrey Turner was among the earliest and most efficient in the settlement of Scituate. He represented the town several years as deputy to the General Court. He was a commissioner, constable, etc." Family F1845
 
119 "I know nothing of Thomas Wight's arrival in New England, or his history there previous to the winter of 1635-6, at which time he seems to have been in Watertown. Over a year later he appears tangibly in Dedham. 'The 18th of ye 5th month, commonly called July 1637' Thomas Wight with eleven other persons, having been duly certified by the magistrates, and having subscribed unto the covenant, was admitted an inhabitant of Dedham. At this time his family consisted of his wife Alice or Elsie, and children Henry, John, Thomas and, doubtless, Mary. In the distribution of lands for homesteads, Thomas Wight received from the town the portion, twelve acres, allotted to each married man.
. . .

"As early as 1649 he became interested in the movement for dividing Dedham, which resulted in the formation of Medfield. . . . On the first of the eleventh month, 1650 (January 11, 1651, N. S.), Dedham surrendered jurisdiction of Medfield. The date of the removal of Thomas Wight from Dedham to Medfield is not known. Whenever he removed he took with him his entire family, except his eldest son Henry. his family consisted of his wife and the following chldren: Henry, Joh, thomas, Mary, Samuel and Ephraim." 
WIGHT, Thomas (I5720)
 
120 "In 1651 the Townes made a permanent home in Topsfield." Family F1940
 
121 "In 1739, removed from Salem to Pomfret Conn. . . . He died May 19, 1790, widely known as a celebrated major-general in the Continental Army during the American Revolution." PUTNAM, Israel (I3858)
 
122 "In 1778 he and his family moved to Danby, Vermont, where they settled on a farm. He was a Quaker. He died in 1800." SMITH, Caleb (I384)
 
123 "In 1799 the couple [Michal and Susanna] were listed as members of the Stoystown Reformed Church." ROSS, James Michael Jr. (I802)
 
124 "In 1822, Ichabod Franklin and son, Whitman, settled on Lot 43 [in Leon]." FRANKLIN, Ichabod (I2816)
 
125 "In 1822, Ichabod Franklin and son, Whitman, settled on Lot 43 [in Leon]." In 1833, the value of the property improvements was $20. FRANKLIN, Whitman (I2821)
 
126 "In late 1738, Caleb married Mary Warren, widow of Ebenezer Warren. They were married by Rev. Samuel Dunbar. David, the NEHGS staff member, suggested that I look at Rev. DunbarŁus handwritten church records from the Parish Church in Stoughton. He glanced through them briefly and discovered that Caleb and Mary Smith had agreed to live separately and apart from one another 6 months after their marriage. The records stated that they could not live amicably with one another, and since there had been no instance of fornication, the church elders lamented their separation as a violation of ChristŁus command in Matthew 19:9. Anyway, further research is needed to determine what happened to Caleb, Sr. He was alive through 1747, but I have found no reference to him after that date. He does not appear in vital records or probate records so IŁull take a look at the Parish Records myself. (Even though Caleb and Mary might have separately permanently, their lives must have remained linked since CalebŁus daughter, Rachel Smith, married MaryŁus son, Benjamin Warren, only a few weeks after their parents married one another!)"

Clarance M. Smith email dated 10/24/06. 
Mary (I2670)
 
127 "In March 1658, Josiah Southwick, John Small, and John Burton wre arrested for bing Quakers, at Dedham, Mass., while on their way to Rhode Island to provide homes for themselves and families and to escape from the intolerant persecutions of the Puritans. They were released and resumed their journey.--Felt's Annuals of Salem . . . ." [Southwick Book p 75.] SOUTHWICK, Josiah (I766)
 
128 "In the absence of any record as to when Edmond Tilson and wife Joane left England, or arrived in New England, we can only form conclusions from the first records at Plymouth, Mass., when he applied to the court, Sept. 3, 1638, for land at Woeberry Plaine, and same year on Oct 1, the court granted him five acres. He was many time on the Jury, evidently a capable person . . . . His residence was at Plymouth, where he died Oct 25, 1660."

 
TILSON, Edmond (I5051)
 
129 "In the absence of any record as to when Edmond Tilson and wife Joane left England, or arrived in New England, we can only form conclusions from the first records at Plymouth, Mass., when he applied to the court, Sept. 3, 1638, for land at Woeberry Plaine, and same year on Oct 1, the court granted him five acres."
 
Joane (I5052)
 
130 "Intestate probate granted to widow, Sandwich, PC."  BRIGGS, John (I4230)
 
131 "Inventory of estate returned Nov 29, 1769, son John Pope, administrator." POPE, Benjamin (I3394)
 
132 "Inventory of estate returned Sept 26, 1753, nephew John Pope administrator." POPE, Samuel (I3395)
 
133 "Inventory of John Smith, deceased, was appraised 16th April 1680." SMITH, John (I3400)
 
134 "Is James [Michael] the son of Rev. David Ross, George Ross's eldest, and Sarah Rolfe? Perhaps it is so, but not one record, E.G. a baptismal, has surfaced."

 
ROSS, James Michael (I798)
 
135 "It is not known in what year he came to America. He was in Farmington, conn., in 1651, where he was an early settler and served several terms as selectman. He and his wife were 'joined' to the church, 9 Oct 1653." (Kellogg Book, p. 25)

"He removed from Boston to Hadley and was one of the proprietors. In 1661, the town made an agreement with him to keep the ferry between Hadley and Northampton, and he built his house on a small 'home lot' which had been reserved by the town for a 'Ferry lot.' . . . He and his son, Joh, and grandson, James Kellogg, kept this ferry until 1758 -- almost a century; and Stephen Goodman, who married a daughter of James Kellogg, kept it still later, and from him it received its last name, 'Goodman's Ferry.' " (Kellogg Book, pp.25-27)


Joseph "sustained his part in the struggle of the settlers against the Indians, and was in command, as Sergeant, of the Hadley troops at the famous 'Turners' Falls' fight, 18 May 1676, which broke the power of the river tribes." (Kelogg Book, p. 27)

Joseph and Joanna had nine children; Joseph and his second wife, Abigail, had eleven children. 
KELLOGG, Lieut. Joseph (I1031)
 
136 "It seems that the baptism of Joshua and subsequently of Mary Buffum were registered at both Great Yarmouth [St Nicholas, Norfolk] in1635 and 1637 respectively and also entered in the registers of Salem, Massachusetts." BUFFUM, Joshua (I3436)
 
137 "It was in 1743 that Joshua accompanied his father-in-law to North Berwick, Maine and resided there for the rest of his life."

"It was proposed in 1934 that a Buffum family organization be formed with the primary objet of acquiring the old homestead at North Berwick, of preserving it as one of the few typical colonial farmhouses left in New England and of using it as a place to which the family may go . . ."
 
BUFFUM, Joshua (I4281)
 
138 "It was probably soon after the baptism of his son Eleazar that he moved to St. James, South Elmham, for he is said (Chandler Manuscripts) to have 'fled for religion in Q. Maries dayes' . . . ." FISKE, Robert (I4662)
 
139 "Jared . .. resides at Rutland. He was, in 1869, a foreman on the marble works in West Rutland, Vt., but is at present a conductor on the Harlem Extension Railroad." PARRIS, Jared L (I289)
 
140 "John and Margaret Smith were among those who were persecuted for their adherence to the opinions of the Quakers. Bishop's 'New England Judge' contains an account of these persecutions, also letters addressed to Governor John Endecott, one signed by John Smith and delivered to him shortly after the death of Mary Dyer in 1660; another signed by Mary Trask and Margaret Smith, dated, 'From your House of Correction, where we have been unjustly restrained from our Children and Habitations; one of us above ten months, and the other about eight, and where we are yet continued by you. Oppressors that know no shame. Boston, the 21st of the 20th [sic] month, 1660.'" SMITH, John (I3400)
 
141 "John and Margaret Smith were among those who were persecuted for their adherence to the opinions of the Quakers. Bishop's 'New England Judge' contains an account of these persecutions, also letters addressed to Governor John Endecott, one signed by John Smith and delivered to him shortly after the death of Mary Dyer in 1660; another signed by Mary Trask and Margaret Smith, dated, 'From your House of Correction, where we have been unjustly restrained from our Children and Habitations; one of us above ten months, and the other about eight, and where we are yet continued by you. Oppressors that know no shame. Boston, the 21st of the 20th [sic] month, 1660.'" [THOMPSON] BUFFUM, Margaret (I4242)
 
142 "John Briggs was first mentioned by Governor Bradford in his Plymouth Colony Records when he was deeded, on 16 April 1640, seven and one half acres of land at Sandwich with the original proprietors of the township." BRIGGS, John (I4230)
 
143 "John joined the Quakers in 1660, Deane says, but probably a little earlier, for John was baptized in 1657, by Mr. Witherell, while Thomas born in 1659, and Rhoda born in 1661 or 1662, were baptized on the account of their mother, Rhoda, who had evidently continued to adhere to Mr. Witherell's church.

"The Friends' records commence in 1680, but a large number of births, which occured before that date, were entered; among them all the children of John, except John and Rhoda.

"He took the oath of freeman in 1657, and is often mentioned in the pubic records for nearly sixty years after that date."  
ROGERS, John (I1195)
 
144 "John Scott, a son of the above [Alexander], was born in 1791, and came with his parents to Hancock county in 1802. He followed farming with his father until he reached manhood, and after his marriage in 1813 to Miss Sarah Stewart, he settled on his father's old home farm, where they remained during life, with the exception of about five years. He reared a family of fourt children -- Mary, John, James C. and George. John is deceased, Mary is living in Ohio, George is in the ministry in Pennsylvania, and James C. is living on the old homestead. Our subject was married twice -- his first wife died in 1839. His second wife, Jane Wallace, whom he married in 1840, died on the 7th of August, 1875, and he followed in November 1877." (Pan-Handle History, p 443.) SCOTT, John (I500)
 
145 "John Smith was a field driver at Dedham in 1708 and a surveyor of highways in 1710. John Smith lived most of his life in Dedham and moved to Ashford late in his life." SMITH, John (I3269)
 
146 "Joseph Pope, the progenitor of the various families of the name now residing in this vicinity, is said to be the son of Robert Pope, of Yorkshire, England. He came to this country in the 'Mary and John,' of London, in 1634, was recorded a Church Member before 1636, made a Freeman in 1637, had lands granted in 1637 and at other time in that portion of Salem now known as West Danvers, and some of it bordering on the Ipswich river. He and his wife Gertrude were before the court in 1658 for attending Quaker Meetings, and in 1662 were excommunicated for their adherence to the opinions of that sect." [Footnotes omitted.] POPE, Joseph (I692)
 
147 "Joseph, in his will, calls wife and daughter 'Bethshua.'" FOLGER, Bethseda (I3345)
 
148 "Joseph, in his will, calls wife and daughter 'Bethshua.'" POPE, Bethseda (I3351)
 
149 "Joshua Buffum was a cordwainer, mariner, fisherman and lived in Salem, Mass., and removed to Berwick, Maine." BUFFUM, Joshua (I4269)
 
150 "Joshua Fisher came to New England in 1639, with his second wife, (Anne Luson), and daughter Mary. His son Joshua had preceded him, arriving some time in 1638. . . . Joshua was made a freeman, May 13, 1640; was a blacksmith by trade; settled first in Dedham, from there going to Medfield at its settlement in 1650. . . . Was the first deacon in the Medfield church, and was a selectman in 1653 and 1655." FISHER, Joshua (I3481)
 

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